EJReynolds – Cybersecurity Commitment

Trust your retirement plan development as well as your personal data with the retirement experts.

We often hear of data breaches with major corporations, even some whose main function is to protect your identity. How can you be sure your data is safe? EJReynolds would like to share with you the measures we take to safeguard the information we collect. Our cutting-edge cybersecurity commitment gives you the comfort and peace of mind that your information is always safe and secure.

How does EJReynolds handle and protect your personal information?

Our state-of-the-art cybersecurity program stems from our core principles of trust, integrity and ethics. We collect only the information necessary to enable us to consistently deliver the best products and services for our clients. We have implemented security standards and processes to ensure that access to client information is limited to your EJReynolds Plan Consultant.

Our Best Practice Cybersecurity Protocols Include:

–    Secure File Sharing with Citrix ShareFile©

EJReynolds’ secure file sharing link provides a safe and secure way to transmit sensitive information online. This assures that files are sent and received with bank-level encryption. You will be required to register through ShareFile’s one-time enrollment process to send and receive files securely.

–    Networks Are Secured with State-Of-The-Art Advanced Firewall Security

EJReynolds’ Firewall Security system protects our computer network from being attacked online by hackers, worms, viruses, etc. It is designed to stop unauthorized access to the EJReynolds computer systems.

–    Internal Networks Are Completely Protected with Industry Leading Threat Protection

Advanced Threat Protection (ATP) helps to protect our organization from malicious attacks by:

  • Scanning email attachments for malware
  • Scanning web addresses (URLs) in email messages and office documents
  • Identifying and blocking malicious files in online libraries
  • Checking email messages for unauthorized spoofing
  • Detecting attempts to impersonate users or organization’s custom domains

    –    Two-factor Authentication

EJReynolds implemented programs that require our Plan Consultants to use a two-factor authentication to protect our clients’ sensitive information. Once an EJReynolds employee logs into an account and enters their password, they receive a code via text or email at a pre-determined address. This code must be entered in a certain amount of time in order to access the account. This helps to ensure that any unauthorized attempts at drafts, distribution requests or other identity theft tricks are halted immediately.

–     Ongoing Training

Along with monthly training on the latest rules and regulations in the retirement plan area, each EJReynolds employee is required to complete a Phish Threat Security Awareness Training. Since the hackers are constantly changing their game, so must our defenses.

Our commitment to your security is just one more reason to trust your retirement planning to EJReynolds.

Solo (k) Plans

Are you a Small Business Owner? Are you Self-Employed? The same retirement plan options available to companies with 10, 20 or 200 employees are also available for your business. Many Small Business Owners may be more familiar with a Simplified Employee Pension (SEP) IRA. With a SEP you can deduct up to 25% of your earned income. However, it may make sense to look at a one-participant 401(k) plan. This combines a traditional employee retirement savings plan with a small business profit-sharing plan. This may make for a larger overall deduction comparable to the same earned income.

Contribution limits in a one-participant 401(k) plan – The business owner wears two hats in a 401(k) plan: employee and employer. The owner can contribute both:

  • Elective deferrals which reduce compensation (“earned income” in the case of a self-employed individual) up to the annual contribution limit:
    • $19,000 in 2019 ($19,500 in 2020), or $25,000 in 2019 ($26,000 in 2020) if age 50 or over; plus
  • Employer contributions up to:
    • 25% of compensation, as defined by the plan, with special calculations for sole-proprietor and partnership entities

Total contributions to a participant’s account, not counting catch-up contributions for those age 50 and over, cannot exceed the lessor of: 100% of compensation, or $56,000 for 2019; ($57,000 for 2020). In addition, the 401(k) limit on elective deferrals is an individual, calendar year limit, not a limit for each plan. If a business owner is also employed by another company and participates in its 401(k) plan, the total of all elective deferrals cannot exceed the annual contribution limit.

Contribution limits for self-employed individuals – If the business entity is a sole-proprietor or partnership, a special computation must be made to determine the maximum employer contribution. When calculating the contribution, it is a circular calculation. Compensation, or “earned income,” is the net earnings from self-employment after deducting both your share of the employer allocation and one-half of your self-employment tax.

Note: The IRS Publication 560 provides rate tables and worksheets for figuring your allowable contribution rate and tax deduction for your 401(k) plan contributions.

Testing in a one-participant 401(k) plan – A business owner with no common-law employees doesn’t need to perform nondiscrimination testing for the plan, since there are no employees who could have received benefits under the plan. The no-testing advantage vanishes if the employer hires employees. If the business hires employees, the plan must satisfy all coverage and non-discrimination requirements as any other 401(k) plan, once they become eligible.

Note: The Plan Document should be flexible enough to protect the employer if employees are hired in the future.

Reporting Requirements (Form 5500) – If plan assets exceed $250,000 at the end of a plan year, the plan will be required to file a Form 5500-EZ, or Form 5500-SF until the plan is terminated and all assets are disbursed.  A one-participant 401(k) plan with fewer assets is exempt from the annual filing requirement. When determining the $250,000 threshold, all plans of the entity are considered; if you sponsor more than one plan, the filing requirement starts when the sum of the assets combined in all plans exceeds $250,000 at year-end.

Note: Failure to file Form 5500 when required can result in substantial penalties on audit.

Most Small Business Owners are familiar with a SEP IRA. Planning for retirement with a 401(k) plan can offer a great degree of flexibility. The basics start with a 401(k) plan; and adding a defined benefit pension plan can greatly increase the potential tax deduction available to a successful business owner. Whether you are adopting a plan for the first time, or have one that needs cleaning up, EJReynolds is here to help.

New 2020 IRS Retirement Plan Limits Announced

The Internal Revenue Service publishes, on a yearly basis, certain Pension Plan Limitations for the coming year.  We have outlined the most commonly applied limits for your reference.

 

Maximum Defined Contribution Annual Additions Limit: 

 

In a Defined Contribution Plan, which includes Profit Sharing and 401(k) Plans, the Internal Revenue Code sets limits on contributions made to a participant’s account.  The Code uses the term “annual additions” which represents both employee and employer contributions as well as reallocated forfeitures.  Effective January 1, 2020, the annual dollar limit for defined contribution plans increases to the lesser of 100% of compensation or $57,000.

 

Maximum Defined Benefit Limit:

 

Ultimate benefit that may be funded for at retirement.  Effective January 1, 2020, the annual dollar benefit under a defined benefit pension plan increases to the lesser of 100% of compensation or $230,000.

Annual Compensation Limit:

Effective January 1, 2020, the annual compensation limit increases to $285,000.

Compensation in excess of the limit will be disregarded for all computation purposes.

Key Employee defined for Top Heavy determination:

  1. A 5% owner, without regard to compensation, or
  2. 1% owner whose annual compensation is over $150,000, or
  3. Officers with annual compensation in excess of $185,000.

Highly Compensated Employee (HCE) defined for 401(k) / 401(m) testing:

  1. A 5% owner of an Employer or an Affiliate in the current or the immediately preceding plan year, or
  2. Any employee earning more than $125,000 in 2019 ($130,000 for 2020)
  3. Constructive ownership rules apply attributing ownership to spouses and lineal ascendants and descendants (parents, grandparents, children and grandchildren) of the owner in both of the above employee definitions.

Maximum Limit on 401(k) Elective Deferral Contributions:

A participant’s elective deferral contributions under all 401(k) plans in which he or she participates during any taxable year increases to $19,500 for the 2020 Calendar Year. 401(k) plans may permit participants who have reached age 50 by the end of the plan year to make annual catch-up contributions once the annual dollar limit or a plan-imposed limit on elective deferrals has been reached.  For calendar year 2020, the limit increases to $6,500.

Maximum Limit on SIMPLE 401(k) or SIMPLE IRA Deferral Contributions:

A participant’s elective deferral contributions under a SIMPLE 401(k) plan or SIMPLE IRA account in which he or she participates during the year is increased to $13,500 for the 2020 Calendar Year. Participants who have reached age 50 by the end of the plan year to make annual catch-up contributions once the annual dollar limit or a plan-imposed limit on elective deferrals has been reached.  For calendar year 2020, the limit remains at $3,000.

Taxable Wage Base:

The Taxable Wage Base for 2020 increases to $137,700.

Please call us with any questions you may have. To print out the 2019 plan limit EJReynolds report, click here.